The Law of Powerlessness

pow·er·less·ness –ˈpourləsnəs/ noun: lack of ability, influence, or power.

The first step of a 12-step program is to admit that you are powerless over your addiction, and consequently, your life has become unmanageable. For many, this is one of the hardest things to do. While it is important to believe in your ability to overcome your addiction, you first must admit that you have an addiction and you need help in order for things to change. Until you do so, drugs, alcohol and other addictions will continue to exert their power over you and control every aspect of your life. The power of admitting powerlessness is that it is the first step to taking back your life.

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We struggle with the concept of powerlessness because it feels so much like helplessness. But God often works through our weakness to bring healing to our lives. It may seem like a contradiction, but there is great strength to be found in recognizing that, within ourselves, we do not have power over an aspect of our lives. The idea that powerlessness will result in strength is the most difficult law to understand and embrace. It is paramount, however, that recovery begin with an understanding of powerlessness. Of note is the fact that powerlessness is vividly portrayed throughout the Bible. In the Book of Judges, for example, we see a pattern in the lives of the Israelites that is similar to the pattern of our own lives.

Our thinking goes something like this. We get so caught up in our own plans and schemes that we stop caring about other people, and we refuse to acknowledge that there is a real God, who deserves respect and obedience. Blinded to the needs of others and the commands of God, we become trapped in our deficient, defective, and devastating ways of trying to find peace and comfort in the midst of all of the problems we have caused for ourselves. Refusing to give up, we try harder and harder to make things work the way we want them to. As we do, we hurt our families and communities and move further away from God.

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Finally, we hit bottom, and there is no way to go but up. Our willingness to change is still weak, and the thought of giving up our addiction is just about the last thing we want to do, but the truth starts to seep into our pores and eventually saturates enough of our being that we begin to see and feel our powerlessness—which has been there all along, throughout our egotistical rants and maniacal attempts to regain control of our lives. As we awaken to our own powerlessness, we begin, for the first time, to allow God to provide us with His strength and to show us His love. As we see even the faintest hint of His strength, we begin to understand how ridiculously powerless we are—and always have been—and we start to allow God to work with us.

As we continue to rely on God’s strength, we begin the step-by-step march toward recovery, transformation, restoration, and victory. As long as we awaken each day to the reality that we are powerless to change ourselves, God will provide His strength as needed, and everything will come together for us.

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As we so often do, the Israelites brought tremendous trouble on themselves by thinking they had everything figured out and under control. Instead of being obedient to the ways of God, they did all sorts of evil and unwise things and fell into the hands of a marauding people called the Midianites. The Midianites either ate or destroyed the Israelites’ crops until God’s people were starving. In fact, the Midianites were so cruel that the Israelites made hiding places for themselves in the mountains, caves, and strongholds.

Though the precise details may differ, the Israelites were just like us. We seek comfort in gluttonous amounts of food, alcohol, pornography, adultery, drugs, possessions, and many other compulsions. Rather than connecting us with God and others, these pursuits eventually send us to the hills and caves to hide our shame—that is, if we’re fortunate enough to still possess a conscience. We sometimes spend years of disconnection, fighting for our lives; until, one day, in a state of powerlessness we do what the Israelites did: We cry out to God for help.

Does any of this sound familiar? “Oh Lord, help me and I will never go back to my old ways.” “God, if you will allow me to live, I promise I will live for you.” “God, if you really are God, please show up in my life and get me out of this mess I’ve created for myself.” “Oh God, this time I mean it. Help me now and I will serve you forever.” Interestingly, God would rather hear us say, “Lord, I repent of my wanton lifestyle. I admit I am powerless over [insert addiction], and can do nothing without you. Whether you get me out of this mess or not, I choose to serve you.”

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God heard the Israelites and responded, just as He responds to us when we finally realize that we have no power. This is precisely where I failed. I seemed incapable of admitting that I was powerless. I simply did not want to see myself as weak or helpless. We read in Judges 6 that Gideon, who was sent by God to strike down the Midianites, is the weakest of the weak, from the weakest clan in Manasseh. When the angel of the Lord appeared to Gideon, he said, “The Lord is with you, mighty warrior” (Judges 6:12). Did you get that? Up to this point, Gideon had done nothing but be afraid and whiny, yet God called him a hero. God knew what Gideon was going to do, and He addressed him according to what He saw Gideon becoming in the future.

So how often have you gotten in trouble because you felt weak and alcohol, sex, cocaine, opiates, or other addictions made you feel strong—or maybe less weak? You probably thought you were not blessed but cursed by God. When our physical, mental, or emotional handicaps have seemed to disqualify us from making a difference, in the pain of that rejection we have sought comfort from things that could not cure us or even help us. But if we would have read, understood, and believed God’s Word, we would have known that we were perfectly situated for God to do great things through us. People would know that, because of our blatant weakness, it was the power of God and not our own power that produced the result.

Right now, if you are feeling as if there is no hope for your broken life, you’re wrong. You are missing God’s invitation. Maybe you’ve committed a heinous act, and your actions have shown that you are powerless over the urges that lead you to that darkest of places. God is calling upon you to admit your powerlessness and allow Him to give you the strength to confess what you’ve done, pay the legal penalty for the offense, and make restitution for the pain you have caused. Yes, you—a child molester, a wife beater, an arsonist, a drug dealer, a prostitute, an embezzler, or a murderer—are nonetheless a creation of an all-powerful God. When you are willing to admit to Him that you are powerless and are willing to make things right in His way, He will give you the strength to do it. Just as He did with Gideon.

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Back to Gideon. The weakest man from the weakest family in the weakest clan in Israel was now put in charge of the weakest imaginable fighting force and told to go into battle—but to do it God’s way. The battle wasn’t pretty, but with jars and ram’s horns and swords and shouts, 300 men, led by an unlikely hero, defeated 135,000 enemy troops. Here’s the point: Gideon was able to admit he was powerless. He knew that without the strength of God, he was still the same powerless, fearful, least-of-the-least man who had cowered in the bottom of a wine press. In the areas of our greatest weakness, God’s strength has allowed us to do the impossible.

Where are you when it comes to the law of powerlessness? Do you still feel as if you have some power left to try a little harder and do a little better and fix yourself? I wanted to be able to fix myself. I guess I thought mom, dad, my brothers and sister, my sons, and the girl in my life would determine I was finally “okay” if I had the personal power to deny my craving for drugs and alcohol. Just stop. I hope you are not holding such an opinion about yourself and your situation. You must come to the end of your rope and turn to God. He has not forgotten you. He has never left you. He has actually been waiting for you to decide to do what He will not force you to do. Remember, we’ve been given free will. He has been waiting for you to call upon Him, admit your powerlessness, and ask for His strength to empower your life.

The law of powerlessness says that if you truly understand and acknowledge that you are powerless, you are about to be provided with all the power you need. If you will simply do the next right thing, one day at a time, a time will come when you will feel as if you are soaring high on eagles’ wings. Don’t miss the remarkable recovery and restoration God has designed for you. If you feel too weak to move forward, admit your weakness to God. Remember what we’re told in 2 Corinthians 12:9: “My grace is enough; it’s all you need. My strength comes into its own in your weakness” (The Message).

If you are feeling weaker than you have ever felt, you are right where God does His very best work. If you will continue to allow Him to, He will do His best work in you, through you, and with you. Don’t give up or give in. Great changes are about to happen in your life and in the lives of those around you. I have been as good as dead in my sin and addiction, truly unable to help myself, pridefully convinced I could pull myself out of a tailspin that was sure to end in a complete crash-and-burn. I was embroiled in active addiction, in bondage to pornography, and committed to protecting my secrets at any cost. But God stayed with me. He continued to reach out through others. Conviction of the Holy Spirit laid bare my sinful conduct. I was completely powerless, but couldn’t bring myself to admit it.

If God can turn my weakness into strength, He can turn your weakness into strength as well. Admitting that we’re powerless is not a decision in the same way that surrendering would be. It is simply a realization of our limitations as human beings. If you’re finally ready to admit your own powerlessness, take a few minutes to memorize the truth in Philippians 4:13: “I can do all things through Him who strengthens me” (NASB). Then get on your knees and admit to God that without Him you cannot break the bondage of addiction. The dichotomy is that there is power in being able to accept your powerlessness.

God bless.

 

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